Shinty > Origins

Origins

It is very likely that sports involving hitting a ball with a curved stick were played in a number of different places around the world. Hutchinson shows us that such a game was being played in Athens in the fifth century BC. And that a sport called camanachd was being played in sixth, seventh and eighth centuries. Shinty and hurling, as played in Ireland today, certainly have the same historical roots. Somewhere along the line of its development into the sport it is today, shinty was linked to training warriors. It was seen to be the perfect way to develop the skills that would be needed in battle. More relevant for 21st century society is the fact that shinty was also seen as the ideal activity through which to learn skills in team-working and to develop positive attitudes and behaviours that would serve people well in their lives. The present-day sport still holds these attributes as important. In Scotland shinty developed as a sport played by people within one community, sometimes competing against people from another community. These competitive matches used to take place on particular festival days, such as New Year’s Day. At that time, there were no restrictions on how many people could be in each team and no written rules. The move to shinty becoming a more organised sport coincided with the emergence of the industrialised society and increased mobility amongst the people of Scotland. Emigrants to Canada took their sport with them and in the harsh winters played on ice – from which the sport of Ice Hockey was born. The eminent shinty historian Dr Hugh Dan MacLennan has also shown that Scots emigrating to the industrial cities of England set up shinty clubs that also incorporated football (soccer). Some of these clubs, such as Chelsea and Manchester United went on to become some of the biggest football teams in the world. The development of any sport is an evolutionary process. And shinty is no different. As shinty started to get organised as a national sport in the late 19th century, one of the rules was that there could be 16 players in a team and that the field of play could be up to 300 yards (275m) long. The current rules of play show how that has changed. Shinty will continue to evolve as a sport. That’s the way to make sure it remains relevant and attractive to young people.

The Womens Camanachd Association had their leagues up running from 1999 . In 2002 a beautiful trophy the: 'Valerie Fraser Cup' was made redundant by the Camanachd Association, so WCA committee member Catherine Cameron enquired about it, Alastair MacIntyre-who was the CA back then, kindly asked the family and they were delighted to donate their cup and have it played for by the Women's Association. The committee decided as they had two competitive leagues running it would only make sense to use this cup as the Women's very own Camanachd Cup and thus the competition for the elite trophy in our sport began. On the 28th July 2002 The Jubilee Park in Ballahullish hosted the first ever Women's Camanachd Cup Final. 

The Shinty/Camogie International began in October 2004 as part of the 100th Anniversary of the Irish Camogie Association.  Since then, the nations have met each year in alternate countries with each year being a highly competitive fixture. The International Shinty/Camogie Challenge Cup is currently held by County Dublin due to their resounding win in Inverness in 2016. The two teams are due to meet again in Dublin in October 2017 as part of a 3-year commitment to the fixture. 


 

 


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